FAQ

Where is your office located?

11500 W Olympic Blvd. Suite 400 Los Angeles, CA 90064

Metered Street Parking as well as Parking in Building

Are you available on weekends?

Yes! I am happily able to have many weekend hours, subject to availability. Please inquire, as I aim to accommodate scheduling needs as much as possible.

I also offer online therapy for greater flexibility – either as a standalone modality for your therapy or as an adjunct to in-person sessions.

Is your office ADA-compliant? I have physical challenges.

Yes! My Olympic office is ADA-compliant. So if you have any physical challenges (eg. vestibular issues, walking, use a wheelchair), I will be able to accommodate you. It’s important to me to have an accessible office so people feel welcomed and supported. Having had my own vestibular and other challenges, I understand the difficulty.

In addition, if there is ever a day where you feel unable to commute to my office due to an issue suddenly acting up, I am able to set up secure HIPAA-compliant visits without advance notice. Of course, video therapy is always available to you as part of my offering. I encourage you to request video therapy even if you don’t feel your best. I have found that therapy still benefits clients in these situations.

I have designed my practice around making you feel comfortable even with physical challenges. If you notice something I have missed, please let me know.

How does therapy work?

My way of doing therapy is designed to alleviate your troubles. I do therapy in a collaborative and safe setting where you can share and ask me questions, knowing confidentiality is upheld in the highest regard.

My approach to helping you will be based on your goals and the organic process in the room. I work collaboratively and empathically to understand your strengths and concerns. Sharing this information with me is a process, so you can feel relief in a safe setting.

I will check in with you as part of my responsibility to respect what you want out of therapy. Sessions are tailored to you, meaning I see and respect you for who you are. True compassion and caring in a safe and confidential space are among my top priorities!

How long does therapy take?

The timeframe of therapy varies for each person. In my approach, I seek to help you find deeper meaning beyond the issues you bring in so that you can attain deeper insight on a variety of issues.

I work with you for as long as the therapy is beneficial. What you need is going to be different than what another person desires.

During our sessions, I will continue to ask you how you feel about our work together, and at any time you can bring up questions and curiosities. You are the expert of your own life. I will never tell you to be in therapy longer than you desire.

How long is each session?

Typically, sessions are 45 – 50 minutes long and occur once a week.

If you wish to have longer sessions, this can be discussed either at the start of seeing each other or in the process of our work together.

I have learned that sticking to a consistent timeframe is important for the therapeutic alliance, but that sometimes a longer session, or more frequent sessions, can be helpful.

The most common format is once a week. I see many clients twice a week, especially in the beginning of therapy, as this can help build therapeutic trust and jump-start the process. I also can accommodate every other week as well – but this is not as beneficial as weekly.

Therapy is designed to be flexible just like the human experience and develop boundaries for a healthier self and satisfaction in relationships.

How do I set up an initial appointment?

How do I set up an initial appointment?

Give me a call at (323) 819-0747 or email me at patrick@patricktullytherapy.com. You are entitled to a free 15-minute consultation before the appointment, so contact me to schedule that – or we can chat via email and schedule the appointment then.

Will you hold my time slot?

I aim to be as flexible as possible, but I will ask you if a certain day and time would work well for you each time we meet (if meeting weekly). I find that consistent days and times simplifies scheduling and also guarantees you’ll likely be able to see me at that time on a regular basis.

We can figure out scheduling week-by-week, as well, as naturally our schedules can change sometimes. But my suggestion is to think of a regular time that works best, so I can hopefully accommodate convenient times for you!

Are you Deaf and know sign language (ASL)?

I’m not a member of the Deaf community, and I don’t know ASL. I’m hard-of-hearing, wear hearing devices, and speak English. If you’re searching for therapists fluent in ASL, I’m happy to provide you referrals to well-regarded agencies that have the ability to best assist you.

How often should I come in for therapy sessions?

Therapy works best when there are regularly scheduled sessions. I recommend once a week, as rapport and trust building can only take place when there is consistency.

It has been my experience that people benefit the most from weekly sessions as the therapeutic experience continues between sessions: think about it, the session is the time where “processing” takes place and between sessions, our mind doesn’t stop thinking, and we don’t stop feeling.

Even when sessions don’t evoke strong emotions, when we meet regularly we are able to work together to increase insight and unpack your experiences. This all has been found to be true through research and my personal experience. Commitment to therapy is important.

Will you go into psychological babble that I can’t understand?

While I was in school for a long period of time where I was exposed to psychological terms, I have spent enormous time in my training to humanize theories. This helped me understand what I was saying, as well as you!

Reigning in theory is an essential component of good therapy, as it allows us both to respond as two human beings working to help you. While you may get a phrase from Freud or a phrase from a movie I’ve seen, it should make sense.

You’re always free to ask questions, and I’m a great reader of body language.

Will I be asked to do homework?

I may have suggestions for stuff to do, but I don’t like to mandate anything. It’s your decision if you want to do an activity… but not every activity that makes sense to me will make sense to you. So, if I suggest something, look it over and see if it helps.

Do you work with certain ages?

I work with most ages, teenagers all the way to elderly adults.

What does therapy look like?

Therapy is an adventure where you’ll be sharing your lived experience. Together, we’ll link that with patterns which you have. Therapy is real life, and, therefore, the relationship between you and me is real.

When walking in, you’ll be met with a gentle demeanor that is curious about your day and wondering about how you’re feeling or what you’re thinking about.

What modalities do you use in therapy?

My method targets specific techniques to the concern or challenge being addressed. I base this on collaboration with you, my knowledge of how therapies have been shown to work in research and with other clients, and other factors.

I have brief descriptions below of various modalities. We can discuss them at any time. I see you as a person and think of theories as they pop in my head and bring them up as they seem relevant. Therapy is a COLLABORATION and more creative than the names of techniques!

I use multiple modalities and apply each as it seems appropriate for YOU.

These include:

CBT/DBT – Cognitive behavioral therapy/ dialectical behavior therapy: Patterns of thought can influence behaviors. Variations of CBT exist to target different conditions and challenges (DBT has a mindfulness component, for example, the steps for CBT vary for different challenges, too.)

Narrative: You choose your voice; the restrictive “medical model” language does not silence you. You get to decide the language and terms to define you.

EMDR: Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing is a technique that targets memories and connected processes in the brain and experiences as they are processed in the brain and has the goal of reprocessing the beliefs and symptoms to alleviate the distress associated with them. Your body can “hold” information (yes, research supports that it’s not only the “thinking” brain that holds information). We can access another layer of information by including EMDR in therapy. My EMDR page has more information.

Mindfulness: How we take care of ourselves in our daily lives, not only in isolated activities can influence well-being.

Narrative Therapy: Language is a powerful tool that influences how we think about conditions. Generic, pathological language can be either helpful or harmful. Since such language has been based on what professionals deemed to be helpful for certain people they saw, it may not help everyone or be true for everyone. Thus, it’s time to be creative!

Psychodynamic: Useful for starting therapy and throughout therapy as it often weaves components together and is fluid. Psychodynamic is often focused on how the past has influenced present behaviors. Other therapies can be a useful adjunct, or they may take precedence depending on the individual.

Humanistic: You are a human being, not a pathology. You are a collaborator in this process as only you are the expert of your own life. I have theories in mind, but I consider you to already be a holder of your power. The journey is to rediscover the locked away power, so you can be empowered. We are equals in the room.

My modalities integrate with human-centered approaches, so the experience is truly about seeing YOU first and instinctively building upon that as part of the rapport between us.

Do you charge extra if I use too many tissues?

No. All my tissues are free of charge. If you need to use all of them, you don’t need to worry about receiving any additional bill. The session is about what you need, and sometimes we need a lot of tissues!

Do you just sit there and not say anything?

While I may take the time to listen or appreciate silence, I’ll be active in the process. I feel a therapist should respond to their clients. If I’m not saying something, I may be taking a moment to encourage you to appreciate how silence can lead to answers. Yes, silence is difficult, even for me sometimes, but be rest assured, we will be communicating as two human beings.

Can I use video therapy in lieu of visiting you in the office?

Many clients have found that online video therapy by itself is extremely helpful. It’s common to use it in conjunction to in-person therapy: when you might not be feeling well, when you might be overwhelmed by the week, or maybe when you’re out of town.

Video therapy is secure and encrypted, and I encourage you to visit the dedicated online therapy page to learn more! Of course, feel free to ask me questions!